Wrapping a Wedding Gift and making it stand out on the present table

With Summer here and your close friends tying the knot, it’s your chance to be Wrapping a Wedding Gift and making it stand out, making the special couple feel rewarded. Even if you’re giving money or a voucher, we can make your gift look fabulous on the present table.

Arranging a wedding can be a joy but it also involves a lot of hard work, coordinating, planning and organising.  Each bride is the proverbial graceful swan, paddling away like crazy, to ensure that everything appears perfect.  Extensive effort is invested in colour schemes, dress designs, fabrics, flowers, table arrangements, stationery designs, favours, photography, menus, venues and honeymoon plans, to list but a few ‘things to do’….

gift wrapped wedding

As a guest, turning up beautifully turned out is a courteous duty to your, no doubt, immaculately polished hosts and, after you have been invited to share this precious and poignant moment in their lives, to observe, dine and celebrate, it is a wonderful gesture to, not merely give a considered gift but to present or, indeed, have delivered, a perfectly and elegantly embellished feast for the eyes, in the form of a thoughtfully wrapped and individually outstanding present.

The bride will appreciate such a wonderful gesture, as she has, no doubt, spent many months, at the very least, considering every last detail of every last minute of this very special occasion.

jane means ribbons

Salmon Ribbon by Jane Means

Your gift may not be the most expensive or flamboyant but it can be remembered for being the most perfectly packaged and for being the gift the happy couple least wanted to open because the wrapping was so utterly charming.

Sometimes it all comes down to the intricate detailing and sometimes simplicity stands out…

 

pleated wedding gift

 

Narrow grey ribbon by Jane Means

Japanese Pleating.
Just as pin-tucked, fine silk pleating adds detailed embellishment to an elegant wedding gown, once mastered, this simple paper-folding technique adds intriguing intricacy and individuality to your wrapped wedding gift.  If the bride’s colour choices are known, carefully selected papers and ribbons can also compliment her colour scheme.

 

wedding present ideas

 

Papers by Fox and Lark
Sage Ribbon by Jane Means

Joining Papers.
Just as the happy couple will be joining their hands in marriage, two contrasting papers can be used to wrap their wedding gift.  Cover the join with a good quality ribbon, tied in a bow, that may secure two small rings (curtain rings look effective, fresh or dried flowers or, if it is appropriate, a pendant in the shape of a cross.

 

Giftwrapped - Champagne bottle, step 8

Champagne.
A very special bottle of wine or good quality champagne makes a lovely wedding gift but many people tie a tag to the neck of the bottle and stop there.  We can do much better than that!  With contrasting tissue papers, shiny cellophane, ribbon and the accessories of sparkly confetti or flower stems, a bottle can become an ornamental vase of a gift.  A generous helping of confetti between the tissue paper and cellophane adds real sparkle to your champagne!

 

map gift wrapping

 

Fern Stripe Ribbon by Jane Means

Theming.
Perhaps the happy couple are adventurous travellers and a more personalised gift wrapping style would really appeal to them… Do you know where they are going on their honeymoon?  If so, use a map of that destination to wrap your gift, ribbons of that country’s flag and a card-backed photograph or postcard of the location as a gift tag.

 

wedding gift wrapping

Boxed simplicity.
Simple boxes are perfect to be dressed for a wedding celebration.  With wedding veil net wrapped around and secured with a bunch of faux roses, an ornate broach or adapted hairclip or piece of jewelry, they look dramatic and yet are very quick to wrap.  A generous, soft lining of contrasting tissue paper also adds a little richness to whatever delights lie inside the box.

 

Jane Means gift wrapping

 

Glitter Paper by Marshalls

For the bride who loves bling!  Wrapping your gift in sumptuous velvet will immediately make it stand out from the crowd.  Jewel colours of emerald green, amethyst purple or ruby red will add to the drama and, tied with a matching metallic edged, wide wire ribbon bow and dressed with lots of wired cut glass and metallic beads, your gift will have glamour and beg for the spotlight. I also love to wrap wedding gifts in bling paper and this glitter one was a remnant from Christmas. With a rich embellishment added your gift will look a million dollars.

wedding wrapped gifts

Romantic silk, pink and pearls.  A parcel presented, wrapped in light pink silk in combination with a pretty floral, pleated paper, tied with darker pink ribbon and entwined and draped with strings of pretty bridal pearls will look innocent and sweet.  Remnants of fabric can be purchased cheaply and make great wrapping for many occasions.  Add a sprig of pink and cream flowers to this gift box for extra femininity and romance. You can even use a paper tablecloth and netting as I have done here.

marbled paper

 

 

Rossi Marbled Paper by Jane Means

This luxurious Rossi marbled paper is perfectly suited to a wedding gift’s presentation.  The rich texture and variegated colours of this Italian, handmade and unique paper can be complimented with green or pink ribbon. This is a great look for a Winter wedding too.

muted ribbons floral s

 

Ribbons by Jane Means

Plain brown paper dressed up for the occasion with grosgrain ribbon, and a bouquet of (artificial) flowers, proves that it is the ‘little black dress’ of the gift-wrapping world.  It may be simple, but, with the appropriate accessorizing, it works for any occasion.

Floral gift wrapping

 

Ribbon by Paperchase
Tag by Jane Means

One step beyond, you could even tie in fresh flowers such as hydrangeas on the day for that dramatic rich look

Whatever you give to the Bride and Groom, with a little thought and effort it will make them feel really special on their Wedding Day.

We’d love to hear from you if you’ve been creative with your gift wrapping too!

 

 

 

Categories: Inspiration, Uncategorized, Weddings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

10 inspirational gift wrapping ideas for Dads Birthday or Fathers Day

No matter how humble the gift, dads know it is the thought that counts and so I have put together a selection of gift wrapping ideas for Dads Birthday and Fathers Day , suitable for the wide range of dads out there.

ribbon key

 

Vintage Grey Ribbon by Jane Means

Why not inject a little humour and mystery into your dad’s day by neatly wrapping his very own garden shed key in a small box.  His real gift will be wrapped and hidden inside the shed but he will have to engage in a little treasure hunt to find it!  An ideal method for the gift of gardening gloves, DIY items or, perhaps, in the shed, you have hidden a batch of dad’s favourite homemade cookies, placed in a jar, perfectly tied with beautiful ribbon in dad’s favourite colour…

Fathers Day gift wrapping

 

Brown and Orange Ribbon by Jane Means

For the dad who loves being surrounded by nature, a natural look, with hints of the countryside can be easily achieved by using traditional, rustic-looking brown paper, always a favourite of mine, and accessorizing with budding twigs, feathers, herbs or wheat.  Using herbs will also give a wonderful country garden scent to your gift

wax seal gift wrapping

 

Wax Seal by Manuscript Company          Narrow Slate Grey Stitched Ribbon by Jane Means

Dads really appreciate presents that have a personalized or signature element to them and so, for the ‘city gent’ dad, what about using the Financial Times as wrapping paper, add a formal looking ribbon and complete your smart wrapping by adding a wax seal for a very sophisticated look.

Hamper gift wrapping

 

True, plants and contents from Clifton Nurseries

Who does not love to receive a hamper full of goodies?!  Make your dad feel special with a mini-hamper packed full of tempting treats and, perhaps, his favourite tipple.  In a simple rustic basket, wrapped with raffia or ribbon and, by tying in wooden cutlery, a napkin or a bottle opener, your dad may not have to leave his chair for many happy hours on Father’s Day!  Sitting on a ruffled bed of tissue paper, olive or preserve filled jars and bags of delicious fudge or chocolates can be tied with ribbon, whilst further specifically selected surprises lurk beneath, making dad feel pampered.

 

Rossi paper

 

Paper by Rossi

For many dads, cars are a favourite topic of conversation and this beautifully coloured and elegant ‘car design’ wrapping paper by Rossi is ideal to wrap a car enthusiast’s Father’s Day gift!  A wide black paper band wrapped around the box provides a road and the addition of a small car model, preferably dad’s favourite, adds the personal touch.  When in doubt, a red sports car usually does the trick!   A nice new bottle of car shampoo could be the perfect accompaniment to such packaging and would also provide dad with something to do too!

DaEnglish

Image Courtesy of DaWanda

There are lots of DIY enthusiasts out there and dads who prize their ever-increasing collection of tools would, no doubt, appreciate the time taken to create a personalized ribbon with tiny nuts and bolts attached.  Combined with brown wrapping paper and, with small wrenches, spanners or screwdrivers tied securely into the bow, the perfect gift inside would be a super-duper shiny new tool for dad’s collection

Randomly scattering and colour- copied, traditional playing cards can produce a very striking,  black, white and red design, which many poker, gin rummy and bridge playing dads alike would appreciate.   Matching with black and red ribbons and using a paper-backed playing card as a gift tag produces a personally themed and very attractive gift box.  The king of hearts might be a good card to ‘play’ as the gift tag for Father’s Day.

map gift wrapping

 

Petrol Blue Stitched Ribbon by Jane Means – Vintage Maps bought at Portobello Market, London

For the dad who travels with work or simply loves to travel, using old or photocopied maps for wrapping paper and gift tags produces a very personalized gift.  Choose a map featuring a country or city that is special to your dad and, for extra detail, select a ribbon bearing the colours of that country’s flag.  The map may bring back shared memories of a family holiday,  be of a place you know your dad longs to visit or, perhaps, the gift inside is evocative of that country’s culture…

The well-groomed dads, who love the feel of a crisp, white shirt and a good suit might like their Father’s Day present wrapped in glossy editorial pages, depicting smart, fashionable menswear.   Select a ribbon that compliments your improvised wrapping paper and replace the bow with a Windsor knot to add a ‘dad-approved’ smartness to the way his gift is ‘tied’!  If I may be so bold, ties of red, purple and shades of blue are considered to be the most positive colours to wear…

burgundy stitched ribbon by jane means

 

Burgundy Ribbon by Jane Means – Music Paper from Les Puces, Paris

If music is one of your dad’s greatest interests, then wrap the Father’s Day gift he will love in the music he loves.  Antique sheet music can be found in charity shops and at flea markets and may also be photocopied onto new paper of your own selection.  Small rolled up scrolls of music and a contrasting ribbon results in a most elegantly presented gift, which is personalized to your dad’s musical taste.

 

Alternatively, you could use plain or traditional brown paper and aesthetically position selected handwritten song lyrics onto the gift box after wrapping.  Black writing on cream paper and white writing on black paper are two of the many possible options.   Handwriting also adds another personal touch. Personally I love understated and classic Monochrome.

Black gift wrapping

 

Black and White Dotty Ribbon by Jane Means – Black paper by Paperchase

Gifts offered with thoughtful, creative and personal touches are, I believe, always the best ones, as they come straight from the heart, and Father’s Day or a special birthday is a perfect opportunity to show that it is not about the size of the gift but about the size of the heart that gives it.

Happy Wrapping!

 

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Gift Wrapping Presentation ideas to make your Valentine feel special

With Valentines Day around the corner, you may be wondering how to pull all of the presentation stops. You’ve bought a luxury gift or maybe a small token present and want to make your loved one feel uber special.
Read on for some great gift wrapping and presentation ideas…

Valentine gift wrapping

Make your own personalised gift wrap. Choose a matt coloured paper and scrawl your favourite message or a special poem with a marker pen (available from Paperchase). I find the faster that you write the better it looks.

Calligraphy project

If you’re writing isn’t brilliant, sign up for a Calligraphy course with Judy Broad (I’m a huge fan of her work)

penhaligon's fragrance collection

Add another sense to your wrapping by lightly spraying on a romantic fragrance or a spritz of your favourite room spray (For me it has to be a dusting of royal favourite, Penhaligon’s)

 

Vintage map wrapping

If you’ve been to a special place why not wrap the gift in a map featuring the location. Ribbon can easily be decorated by gluing some dried rose buds for an effect

gift wrapping idea

If you’re wrapping something awkward like lingerie or a tie, wrap it in some tissue and add a strip of thick paper to keep the shape. Here i’ve added some Narrow red ribbon and a tag to decorate

gift voucher idea

If you’re giving a voucher, keep the envelope blank and tie in some fresh roses on the day.

Whatever you give and however small it is, you can go that extra mile by just thinking about the recipient. The gift doesn’t necessarily need to be wrapped in the colour red, but maybe their favourite shade or pattern. One year my husband presented me with a gift wrapped in newspaper, teamed with some red stripe ribbon and it looked fantastic.

We love seeing your projects and gift wrapping ideas so please keep them coming to our Facebook page

 

Happy Wrapping x

 

 

Categories: Inspiration, Projects & Demos, Uncategorized, Valentine | Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Join me for a gift wrapped Champagne lunch at Coworth Park

I’m really looking forward to hosting a festive gift wrapping day on Monday 14th December.  It’s being held at the gorgeous Coworth Park (sister of the Dorchester Hotel), nestled just outside of Ascot.

Jane Means at Coworth Park

Guests can enjoy a glass of champagne on arrival and a three-course lunch in Restaurant Coworth Park with a glass of wine, coffee and chocolates.

Coworth Park speaker event

Events start at 12 noon and cost £50 per person, including a glass of champagne on arrival in the Drawing Room and a three-course lunch in Restaurant Coworth Park with a glass of wine, coffee and chocolates.

Luxury Gift Wrapping

After lunch I will be hosting a gift wrapping masterclass, which will be packed with lots of Christmas tips and ideas. At the end of the day guests can grab a signed copy of ‘Giftwrapped’ and enjoy some shopping in the adjoining conservatory.

There are a few places left so be sure to book your place. Get Christmas gift wrapped  and I will see you there for some festive fun, present wrapping and champagne!

For more information and booking please contact Coworth Park

Happy Wrapping!

 

 

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Join Jane Means and Kirstie Allsopp at The Handmade Christmas Fair Manchester

This month Jane Means will be sharing her Gift Wrapping Tips with Kirstie Allsopp live at The Handmade Christmas Fair at Manchester Central. The duo will be on stage in the Super Theatre on Saturday 21st November at 4pm.

Jane Means and Kirstie Allsopp

Jane will will be sharing stories about her career, talking about her plans to start courses in Asia and Australia and she will also be signing copies of her book ‘Giftwrapped’

GIFTWRAPPED COVER v9

As well as the demonstrations, expert talks and workshops, the fair is packed with handpicked exhibitors selling crafts, jewellery, haberdashery and gifts for Christmas.

We are giving away 2 tickets to the fair which takes place from 20th-22nd November, so head over to our Facebook page to enter.

The Handmade Christmas Fair

In September the team exhibited at the Handmade Fair at Hampton Court and had a great time. Jane did workshops for 300 people at a time, the largest number for her to teach ever!

Jane Means at The handmade Fair

 

 

It was great to see so many people on the stand, with many visitors travelling from as far as Melbourne and Jakarta!Jane Means Ribbons

 

We are now in the middle of our busy Christmas season doing our Christmas shows and Gift Wrapping Courses.  Jane has been filming Christmas commercials for WHSmith and has been busy behind the scenes with Kirstie, so make sure that you keep an eye on your TV screens at Christmas!

 

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An insight into our new Singapore Gift Wrapping Courses

We recently launched our first creative Singapore gift wrapping courses at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel with press in attendance. The creative classes were scheduled to coincide with the 50th Anniversary of Singapore Independence, known as SG50.

Singapore day courses

With several recent visits to South East Asia to promote the publication of the Giftwrapped book, the inaugural creative workshop was held on 11th July.

Singapore events SG50

mandarin oriental

We teamed up with Singapore’s number one course provider LessonsGoWhere who did a fantastic job marketing our Asian courses.

pastel gift wrapping

On arrival Delegates were treated to sumptuous homemade cookies and signature coffee’s made by our personal barista Jean.

Jane Means at Mandarin Oriental Singapore

Singapore creative courses

The morning session was a hive of activity involving luxurious gift wrapping, papercraft and bow making, and we were lucky enough to enjoy a spectacular view from our meeting room.



Singapore creative classesSingapore creative courses

Mandarin Oriental Singapore events
Although finger sandwiches were provided, guests enjoyed lazing under breezy canopies at the poolside bistro tempted by the tropical salads and signature juices.

Mandarin Oriental Singapore Class

 

During the lunch break I took time out with the delightful Tara Barker, Editor of Singapore Women’s Weekly, who was reviewing the course. You will be able to see her feature on the magazines Facebook and Instagram Page

Singapore creative class

Gift wrapping course Asia

craft course singapore

Creative juices were flowing with plenty of fun and laughter in the afternoon, where we tackled gift wrapping awkward shapes and making hand made decorations.

 

gift wrapping training certificates

Creative workshop Singapore

The happy delegates received their well earned certificates after indulging in to complimentary tea, cookies and pastries

Singapore training courses

On departure they were treated to a goody bag before heading home. At the end of a special day we were treated to a spectacular display as part of the Singapore SG50 celebrations.

SG50 celebrationsmarina bay sands singapore

Crowds flocked to see the fly pasts and fireworks displays over the breathtaking City skyline, and we were lucky enough to grab a great view from the roof terrace.

Singapore celebrating 50 years

 

Singapore SG50 fireworks

 

I will be running another Gift Wrapping Course in Singapore on August 1st. With the busy festive season approaching, I will be returning in the Spring of 2016 to run some more events.

luxury gift wrapping

If you would like any updates about our worldwide courses with early bird offers up for grabs, make sure that you’re on our mailing list by emailing us at info@janemeans.co.uk

Happy wrapping!

Singapore gift wrapping course

 

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How I dealt with having my designs copied and copyright advice.

Creative industries in the UK annually bring in £71 billion pounds and this is growing by 10% each year. I am surrounded by creative people and designers, and one of the biggest concerns is copyright and IP issues (known as Intellectual Property),  so I’ve decided to dedicate a blog post sharing my own experience, with advice on how to deal with designs being copied.

I have always loved experimenting, designing and making my own things whether it be handmade cards, upholstery, calligraphy, textiles and crafts.  Having your designs copied when you’re in business can be a real time consuming and costly headache. As many of you will know, I have had several experiences of being copied and you dread the expense, legal fees, wasted man-hours and the huge effort to fight your case.

 

Author and designer Jane Means

Many small designers and businesses have shared similar experiences or asked for help. Even the big fashion houses who launch their new collections on the catwalk will have copycat designs out in days. This can sometimes be a positive thing, buyers may wish to try out the cheaper version, and may eventually buy the ‘real thing’.

 

So what do you do when you think your idea has been copied? Well in my case it was to talk it over with my family, friends and staff to see what their thoughts were incase I was over reacting. You will get an honest answer here, but I usually trust my own instincts. I would then seek some legal advice and look for help online.

Apple mac keyboard

Photo courtesy of tutsplus.com

 

My first experience of being copied was by a family friend. She had started her own gift wrapping service which I had no problem with (It’s a free world and I believe competition is healthy), however I was horrified to see the content of her website.  It had virtually been a copy and paste job directly from my own website.  I’ve also had experiences where photos of my work have appeared on competitors websites (I will talk to you about this later) and usually a short ‘to the point’ letter or phone call will rectify the situation.  Competition is healthy but copying isn’t.

Ribbon storage dispenser

I am a firm believer that those who work hard and put in the effort will get results.  As Theo Paphitis recently quoted at an awards event in Birmingham “You only get out what you put in”.  There is nothing like an original and when you see a copycat design, in my eyes it’s a second class product.

jan costantine

 

Photo courtesy of Jan Constantine

One classic case I regularly see is lookalike cushions from the Jan Constantine range.  Although her designs are very Union Jack (which you can’t copyright), they are unique in their own way and often copied. The company pretty much have a constant legal battle protecting their work.

 

Jane Means dogs and cats ribbon

My first legal case was with Berisfords Ribbons.  For years I had a really good relationship with them as one of their stockists.  I had designed a classic dog and cat ribbon for Liberty and decided to use Berisfords as my manufacturer. I gave them my artwork and had the range made.  Much to my horror, they produced their own designs a few months later.  They were so similar that it fooled most of the industry.  I took legal action and won my case.

Berisfords dog cat ribbon

Despite it being a costly and upsetting process, the main thing here for me was to hold my head up high, stay professional and keep designing.  We were inundated with emails and customer comments but for me it was the support of clients, customers and fellow ribbon competitors. My staff were also upset so it was crucial to stay calm and weather the storm. I am lucky to have a loyal following on Social Media who were very supportive, however I know of a company who had been copied and went to the extreme lengths of deactivating their social media accounts so their business activity could remain private, with competitors (and customers) being left in the dark.

 

I have worked in the gift industry for nearly 20 years and have heard so many stories with small designers finding their work copied and on the shelves of High Street stores.  I sat next to a buyer of a well known discount home store on a flight back from Hong Kong chatting away about my work.  Months later a customer got in touch congratulating me on stocking the chain, except that wasn’t the case.  This was a classic case of being copied.

Bookishly v marks-and-spencer

Louise Verity from Bookishly took on Marks and Spencers after seeing typographic arts prints similar to hers. After a series of lawyers letters, M&S claimed it was unfounded.  Rather than taking further action which would have been a financial nightmare, Louise used lawyers to highlight the experience on social media.  It got a lot of support from the public, press and the design community, but Marks & Spencer maintained their position. They said the product was a short print run and wouldn’t be reprinted. M+S eventually removed it from their website and sold through their stock.

Louise says “I’m not exactly happy with the situation, but I have come to accept that the best thing to do is to rise up and move on. Getting caught up in the unfairness of the situation isn’t going to get the creative juices going”.  I was mesmerised by Louise’s experience on the Folksy Blog and her feature has some great advice.

 

Jane Means and Dids Macdonald ACID

With my various experiences, It gave me food for thought so I decided to speak out and become an Anticopy campaigner helping other designers.  For this feature I have got together with a couple of top experts in this field.  Dids Macdonald (D) is the CEO of ACID and has had over 25 years experience in the design industry, and Niall Head Rapson (N) is a leading copyright lawyer for McDaniel and Co.  We filmed a feature together and here are some of the most common issues that designers can face.

 

How can designers protect their work if their budget is very small?

N: Most of the work that a designer creates does not require formal registration as it is automatically protected by Unregistered Design Right and Copyright You don’t have to pay any fees to protect your work.  What you must do though is make a thorough design history of your work and make sure the work is dated.  Ideally this should be by someone else.  A©ID, as part of their membership offer a Deposit Scheme where you send them your designs.  This is crucial to ensure you get an independent verification of a date before which the designs must have been created.

You can also registered your Designs and Brand names but these come at a cost.  A registered design will cost you a minimum of £60 and a trade mark a minimum of £200.

JM: As well as ACID, You will find lots of useful information on the UK Copyright Service website.

 

What do you do if someone asks to take a photograph of your work for exhibition stand?

 

N: Say no.  It is the easiest way for your designs to be published, sent around the world and copied.  If someone wants images of your products, ask them what they want them for.  If you think you want to send them some images then make sure you have all the details of the contact.  If they have your images and not theirs and you know who they are then you have more control over what they do with the images

 

D: Be very careful as designs can be the other side in seconds and on a production line in minutes so the word is caution.

 

JM: For me I would always ask for a business card.  Quiet often the photographer could be an admirer, blogger or journalist and it’s always a good idea to ask the permission before you snap away, whether you are on holiday or admiring someones work.

British ribbons wholesale

What can you do if you find your photograph on another website?

 

N: It is annoying especially if it is without your permission.  The first thing to do is to as the website to remove the image.  If they won’t do that, then you send what is called a “Take Down Notice” to the web host.  The web host will more often than not remove the offending web page.  This is because if they don’t they can be liable for the use of the photograph.

 

Is there an easy way you can track where your photographs are being used online?

 

N: There are some imaging software products available but ideally you need to make sure that you have a record of who you have given your images to, and more importantly told them what they can and cannot do with them.  If you can, make a secure area where someone needs a password to download images (such as Flickr) and have terms of use of the photograph

JM: There’s a great little app called Picnic that will easily find where your images are being used online. Photo sharing websites such as Pinterest will have a facility where you can report if your image is being used without your consent. A simple search on google images can soon pick out similar images as well as your own.

 

Deckchair stripe ribbons

 

When do you distinguish when something has been copied?

 

N: It is possible that someone has created something that is the same as yours but done so independently.  However, if the person who has the copy is someone you know or has seen your work because, for instance, they are a customer or they made an enquiry. then it is likely that they have copied your work.  In legal terms if they have had access to your design then it is for them to prove they did not copy your work

 

What is the first step to take once you realise that your design has been copied?

 

N: You need to write to them and let them know that you think they have copied your work.  Ideally this should come from a lawyer to make sure that you don’t make threats which you shouldn’t make.

 

D: First of all don’t panic, gather all your evidence for your design audit trail and try and buy a copy of the product, and obtain the receipt this is really important. You then need to get professional advice but you can do a lot yourself.

 

 

What is the process for taking legal action?

 

N: If they won’t stop or acknowledge you then you need to decide if you want to issue court proceedings.  You will need to have court papers drawn up which sets out your claim.

 

D: Normally a letter from your solicitor will do the trick highlighting the case. This can be sorted out of court with direct correspondence. Only a very very few cases actually go to the final court hearing

 

What type of costs are involved?

 

N: Well if it doesn’t involve Registered Designs or Patents you can use the IP Small Claims court which is cheaper.  It will also depend if you use a lawyer or not.  If you don’t use a lawyer it will cost up to £735 for the Court fee to start the claim.  If you use a lawyer then it can cost up to £10 000.  If you need to use the Intellectual Property Enterprise Court then the cost is up to £50k.

 

D: That really depends on how long the and the legal letters take to go backwards and forwards that’s why the first letter before action is really important so you got all the evidence is strong case and to put together side which can’t be legally challenged.

JM: The small claims court is the low-hassle way to take legal action for up to £10,000 against a firm or individual. You can represent yourself quite easily and the Citizens Advice Bureau can also offer additional support. I would strongly suggest that you use a solicitor to draft a strong letter at the start.  You will then appear serious with a legal team behind you.

goody bag ideas

Is it true there are seven points of difference?

 

N: No.  Each case is taken on the facts of the case.  What a Court looks for is if the essence of the design has been taken.  They look to find the intellectual skill and effort a designer has put into the design.  There can be one point of difference which defeats a claim or there can be 20 points of difference which make no difference to the Court.  Generally if you have a design that someone has set out to copy then you will have a strong case.  See the images in the Red Bus Case

 

What legislation is there to protect designers?

 

N: There are lots of Acts of Parliament and European Legislation which protects Designer interests.  Most of it is covered by the Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988.  If you have registered trade marks or designs then these are covered by the Trade marks Act 1994 and the Registered designs Act 1949.  There was an Intellectual Property Act 2014 which brought in Criminal Sanctions for infringement of Registered Designs

 


brown paper gift wrapping

I am being followed on Pinterest and Twitter by my competitors should I block them?

 

N: It is up to you but if they copy you, then you will have proof that they have had access to your designs.  They will still be able to look at your designs on your web site, on any sites you sell on, or your stockists sites so blocking them isn’t going to stop them seeing your products, but it will make it easier to prove they know about you.

 

D: In one word yes

 

Are any rules or legislation coming into force to protect designer’s rights?

 

N: There is a lot out there already which covers you.  It would be nice if there were criminal sanctions for unregistered design right as there is for copyright.  There isn’t anything in the horizon at the moment that isn’t covered already

Can you insure yourself against copyright?

 

N: You can take out an insurance policy that will pay your legal fees if you are infringed.  A©ID have one of the best ones on the market for designers which pays out up to £100k to take legal action

 

D: Yes.  This is an exciting time because there is an insurance that’s just come in called  ACID IP Insured. We insure our cars, we insure our homes, we insure our possessions, so why not a business and future?

 

cat and dog ribbon

 

Everyone loves a story behind a product and for me when I am designing a new ribbon collection, I have usually been inspired by something I’ve seen or experienced.  The dogs and cats designs were from actual photos of pets belonging to my friends and family and made in to silhouettes.

 

Colours that I bring in to a collection can have a story too.  The fuschia designs were from a flower I’d photographed whilst on honeymoon in Tahiti, the vibrant dots and stripes from my favourite sweets, Liquorice Allsorts!

Jane Means Dotty Ribbons

 

Copying is often referred to as underlying form of flattery.  To me it is just lazy business behaviour, and I am really pleased to see that several High Street stores have signed up in support of the “Don’t copy it Campaign’ including John Lewis and Selfridges.

My biggest annoyance is participants who come on a gift wrapping workshop, and then turn around and start teaching that same course, with similar descriptions, price and content. They then start drifting on to the same websites and forums using identical keywords and hashtags. I have even had requests from people who want to ‘shadow’ a course for free before starting their own – unbelievable!

20 Years ago when my business was born there was no internet, It took me years of teacher training, researching the old fashioned way, course writing, long hours, unpaid work, sweat and tears to get the workshops off the ground.  I think it is now easier than ever to be copied and to be accused of copying in this digital age. Through the years I have kept a log of photos, notes, scrapbooks which not only bring back lots of great memories but acts as my IP proof.

On a final note, the best thing for me is that people fly from all over the world to come on the courses.  I am shortly starting my first creative classes in Singapore and the only way to carry on and strive ahead, is to be a leader, and not a follower.

 

 

Jane Means filming ACID feature

We’d love to hear any comments below.  For all other enquiries please email us directly at info@janemeans.co.uk

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Categories: Gift Wrapping Courses, Projects & Demos, Ribbon | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

10 recycling & eco friendly gift wrapping ideas

I’m often asked about recycling tips and eco friendly gift wrapping ideas, so I decided to dedicate a chapter in my book ‘Giftwrapped‘ about it. It is also an important part of my business so we recycle everything from ribbon spools, packaging and remnants.

financial times gift wrapping

Although I’m not a hoarder, I hate throwing away small offcuts, leftovers and remnants so here’s my top ten gift wrapping ideas to help the planet.

Fabric wrapping

Fabric leftovers

1. If you’ve got to tackle an awkward shape, raid your sewing stash and use a fabric remnant. Here I’ve used a thick linen and frayed the edges by hand, adding a luxury ribbon and embellishment to wrap a vintage vase.

 

pleated ft gift wrapping

Pleating leftover newspaper

2. Give boxes the luxurious touch by pleating a leftover Financial Times newspaper.  Use double sided tape for a professional finish.

To pleat the paper you make small folds in the paper (ensuring they are straight) and add some sticky tape to the reverse to avoid the paper stretching when you start wrapping the box. (There’s an easy step guide in my book)

dvd roses

Wrapping plants

3. When gift wrapping a plant, use a fabric remnant or a used (but clean) paper tablecloth.

These are both flexible for awkward shapes and are suitable for a damp base as the moisture will soak in to the wrapping.

 

recycled gift wrapping ideas

Adding Sticks and feathers

4. For a rustic finish add in sticks and feathers to your gifts collected on country walks using brown paper with raffia or string.

You can also recycle creased or used brown paper and this is a suitable style when wrapping gifts for men.

egg box eco gift wrapping

Pop small gifts in to empty egg boxes

5. Empty egg boxes can be decorated and are perfect for small gifts, chocolates or soaps.  Add a band of decorative paper or fabric and tie a bow to finish

wrapping a magazine subscription

Use old scarves for that element of luxury

6. I love the Japanese form of fabric wrapping (known as Furoshiki).  Old silk scarves make great wrapping for awkward shapes.

In this project we’ve rolled up a magazine with a subscription and tied it neatly in a scarf.

eco friendly gift wrapping idea

Joining paper leftovers

7. If your paper isn’t long enough to go around a large box, join an extra piece and cover the join with ribbon.

This looks very creative if you mix 2 opposite papers and is ideal for using those short leftovers you would normally throw away.

A roll of brown paper is an ideal paper that goes with most colours and designs.

music paper gift wrapping

 

Scrolls and straws

8. Small scraps of paper such as music sheets can be easily added as a decoration. Roll them up with a paper straw underneath and tie in with ribbon.

Eco wrapping tips

Tie in fragrant herbs and foliage

9. Add an extra sense by tying in fragrant herbs or foliage. The most suitable for gift wrapping are Rosemary, Bay, Laurel and Ivy.

You can also write on foliage to make rustic gift tags too.

 

paper cones

10. Paper cones can easily be made with vintage music script and are perfect for children parties, sweets and snacks.

If you wish to giveaway a small gift, the cone can be sealed at the top with some skinny ribbon.

 

I would love to hear about any of your own recycling projects and hope you will now look through your garbage with new eyes!

 

Happy wrapping…

 

 

 

 

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Make your own gift hampers with this basket weaving DIY tutorial

I love to give gift hampers and whilst on a recent trip to the Yasawa Islands, I was lucky enough to see an inspiring basket weaving demonstration which really grabbed my attention.

Tokoriki beach Fiji

I am a huge fan of botanical prints and anything natural and luckily I had a camera to hand to cover this amazing project.

plam trees

I was so impressed that I started having crazy ideas about running my gift wrapping courses in a tropical climate covering gift hampers with a bit of basket weaving thrown in!

photo 2-1

The basket was made out of part of a palm tree leaf, and I realise that sadly many of us don’t have access to a palm tree in the back garden.

photo 1-1

Firstly you cut approximately one third of the bottom of the leaf including stem (you will need a really large carving knife for this so it’s not something you can easily take away on holiday to do this!)

basket making

The palm leaf will consist of a thick stem with a row of leaves either side. You will start on the first side of the leaf brading in leaves in 3’s working your way along. Suni our lovely demonstrator made this look so easy!

basket weaving

It will resemble a really clean herringbone pattern as shown here.

weaving palm leaves

You will then repeat the same the opposite side.

weaving a fresh basket

With both sides of the leaf now braided you will need to bring the two edges together. You will then start braiding this all the way across.
palm tree leaf weaving
You will then plait the two ends of the leaf (as you would long hair) then cut the ends neatly.

photo 1-3

It will now resemble an oval weaves balloon shape. Take the carving knife and cut out the middle of the stem along the leaf.

fresh basket weaving

 Some of the stem will remain each side to act as a border.
basket weaving

 

Bring the 2 long plaited ends together and double knot the ends together so you have a good size handle
The middle stem that has been cut out  but can also act as a shoulder axel to carry the basket if it’s heavy.
fresh basket weaving

 

Even though I don’t currently live in a tropical climate, I love this idea and it would be a great hamper idea filled with fresh fruit or to store towels in a guest room
You can also use it as a base for a hamper and add some clear cellophane and raffia to decorate. You will find some hamper ideas in my book ‘giftwrapped
palm tree bowl
I also noticed lots of other ideas on Pinterest including a fresh bowl made from palm tree leaves (courtesy of Erin Bouma)

palm tree wreath

Another idea is a neat woven door wreath (courtesy of Crafty and Beyond ) and I love the one below by  Coastal Living

Screen Shot 2015-01-14 at 20.57.45

 

After the hectic 2014, I had a thoroughly good holiday and have come back ready to face the world.

This is another exciting year with lots in the pipeline and we will keep you posted!

 

jane means blog copy

 

From myself and my team we would like to wish you all a very happy and healthy 2015

Jane x

Categories: Inspiration, Projects & Demos, Tips + Techniques, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

How to tie the perfect bow in gift wrapping

One of the most asked questions I get asked on our gift wrapping workshops is “How do you tie the perfect bow?”.  We all have our own way of tying a shoelace or a bow and through my experience of teaching gift wrapping, I’ve found it’s very hard to change your technique after tying the same bow all of your life

tying a bow

I did a day skipper sailing course several years ago and thought the knot tying part would be so easy.  To my horror I failed my knot exams and was all fingers and thumbs. Although I had to resit the exam, it gave me food for thought and made me realise that many people will struggle to tie the perfect bow.

 

I have seen so many ways of tying a bow and my advice is to use the same technique that you’ve used all of your life with a couple of changes that will help you enormously.  Many of us tie a loop at a time, however some will form 2 loops and tie them together (known as the bunny ears).  During my workshops I have seen many different techniques and everyone can tie the perfect bow.

the perfect bow

The ideal bow should resemble a perfect angled letter ‘X’ so it is a good idea to imagine this X and follow the outline as you are tying your bow.  The 2 loops should be at 10 and 2 o’clock and the 2 tails should sit at 8 and 4 o’clock.

ribbon bow

The critical point is the part just before you pull the bow tight. Take a pause and look at the outline of your bow.  This will give you a chance to re arrange the bow so the loops and tails are in the correct position. If your bow looks messy or out of proportion, if you rush ahead and pull the bow tight it will still look a mess and out of proportion.

Turquoise ribbon

Another helping hand is to choose a double sided ribbon that has the same finish on both sides. Many of my students say that tying a wired ribbon is a lot easier. If you are working with a printed ribbon like this turquoise spotty design, ensure that you twist the ribbon to the correct side as you tie your bow.

For lots more bow techniques and gift wrapping projects, grab a signed copy of my new book ‘giftwrapped

Happy bow tying!

 

Categories: Projects & Demos, Ribbon, Tips + Techniques, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
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